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Green Roof Plant Blog

Linaria vulgaris

Jeff Harrison - Thursday, September 15, 2011

Common Toad Flax, Butter and Eggs

By Jorg Breuning

Linaria vulgaris ~ Photo by Jorg Breuning


Linaria vulgaris is listed by the USDA as noxious weed for several western states.  I believe that this plant can be tolerated on un-irrigated green roofs in states where it is not considered noxious.  This plant helps to prevent wind and water erosion on extensive green roofs.  In a green roof environment it’s height is stunted to 1/4 normally sees on ground dwelling plants.  Linaria vulgaris is also a great food source for honey bees and is not considered a noxious weed in states east of the Mississippi River.  

Tell us what your thoughts are on the use of introduced or non-native plants on green roofs.

 

Allium senescens sub. Montanum var. glaucum

Jeff Harrison - Thursday, September 15, 2011

Circle Onion

By Kat Harrold


Allium sensescens ~ Photo by Kat Harrold

Allium sensescens is a showy end of summer to early autumn bloomer that does well in both full sun and full shade.  Its light pink pompom is about an inch in diameter and somewhat resembles a beach ball floating across a sea of gray green wavy leaves.  A fragrant member of the Alliaceae family, it can contribute to a bouquet of scents in a floral herb garden.  This plant is most suited for extensive to semi-intensive green roofs and requires little maintenance.

Hieracium maculatum

Jeff Harrison - Thursday, September 08, 2011

Hieracium maculatum  - Kat Harrold

Hieracium maculatum is a great green roof plant for full to part shade green roofs.  Soft hairs on the leaves help it adapt to dry sunny locations as well.  Plants less than a year old may require extra attention in areas of full sun during extreme heat and drought conditions.  Given proper nutrients and water this herbaceous plant is repeat bloomer and can provide a spray of bright yellow flowers from early to late summer.

Hieracium maculatum may be grown on a green roof either from plugs or seeds.  It is best suited for extensive to semi-intensive green roofs.     

 


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