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Elevating Urban Farms onto Rooftops

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Wednesday, January 09, 2013

By: Jörg Breuning

 
Photo credit: Kölner Wein Depot

Long before green roofs became necessity and rooftop farming was trendy in North America, Dipl.-Ing Markus Wittling was planning to elevate an entire vineyard on top of the Wine Museum in Cologne, Germany.  Build in 2002, the sloped green roof spans over the entire museum building of almost 20,000 square feet. It is the first vineyard on a roof, the first sloped rooftop farm and the first and oldest organic urban farm on a roof in the world.

In the middle ages Cologne was the most important wine trading town north of the Alps.  The "Weinmuseum Köln e.V." is honoring this factwith a brand new museum with astonishing and educational exhibits on wine. The green roof displays 40 of the most important grape species from around the world situated onto 720 vine stocks.  The soil layer (growing media) including granular drainage is approximately 27 inches deep and consists of a blend of porous volcano material like Lava rock and Pumice - materials in which grapes simply grow best. 

 This rooftop vineyard is a prime example of the performance of modern green roof technology and is ideal for educational purposes.  If you have a chance to visit Cologne, the Wine Museum is a must on your Green Roof Safari and your effort will be rewarded with amazing wine tasting

For more information: www.weinmuseum.com or simply contact us.

 

 

Creating Biodiversity Through Rooftop Farming?

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Tuesday, June 19, 2012

By Kat Harrold

 

Photo By ~ Kat Harrold

Rooftop farming has the allure of self-reliance in a world of food uncertainties.

It is well known that urban agriculture on rooftops has recreational and educational value. However when it comes to economy and ecology these little pieces of intensive used land in polluted cities are more than questionable.

Depending on crop selection rooftop farms can provide habitat for several pollinators. At the same time they also provide food and shelter for insects, birds, and small mammals that might not be wanted. On ground remote locations it is very difficult and labor intensive creating a natural balance among wanted and unwanted organisms. Finally it depends on your goal, the time you like to invest, how much additional weight your roof can carry and last but not least your experience and knowledge in farming on impervious areas. Potentially urban agriculture on roofs or rooftop farms can be a diverse environment or – most likely - a monoculture stage for chemical warfare between man and nature.


Join us next week as we cover bio-diversity on semi-intensive green roofs!

The Dirt on Urban Farming

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Tuesday, May 08, 2012

By Kat Harrold

Photo by - Jorg Breuning

For some the dream of farming on the roof is a mere extension of window box gardening while for others it can literally mean bringing the farm to the roof.  For those DIY farmers out there here are a few things to consider for your garden in the sky.

Whether you are creating an extensive or intensive green roof, always check to make sure the roof is strong enough for whatever weight load you might be adding to it.  The last thing you want is to wake up one morning feeling like a freshly planted spud.

Speaking of spuds, for the adventurous rooftop farmer looking to plant more than just a few herbs or the occasional tomato, consider creating raised planting beds.  When it comes to the health and safety of your green roof one of the most important things to keep in mind is proper drainage.    The organic material that is so good for your crops is a death sentence to the drainage system.  When the organic particles break down they get lodged in the filter fabric which can cause standing water and even bigger problems in the winter when it freezes.  To keep your roof happy and healthy, create a separate area, such as a planting bed with a bottom or container, for plants requiring deep rich soil like carrots and potatoes.  

Building raised planters can be advantageous for plant and farmer.  By having a set up allowing for the farmer to tend to the plants without crawling around the vegetation you protect the plants from accidental damage and compacting the soil.


Roof to Fork Menu

    Ratatouille (recipe courtesy of epicurious.com)

    (all vegetative ingredients can be grown in a regular semi-intensive green roof set up with no additional organic matter needed)

        1 onion, sliced thin
        2 garlic cloves, minced
        5 tablespoons olive oil
        ¾ lb eggplant, cut into ½  inch pieces (about 3 cups)
        1 small zucchini, scrubbed, quartered lengthwise, and cut into thin slices
        ¾ lbs small ripe tomatoes, chopped coarse (about 1 ¼ cups)
        ¼ teaspoon dried oregano, crumbled
        ¼ teaspoon dried thyme, crumbled
        ¼ fennel seeds
        ¾ teaspoon salt

        ½ cup shredded fresh basil leaves

In a large skillet cook the onion and the garlic in 2 tablespoons of the oil over moderately low heat, stirring occasionally, until the onion is softened. Add the remaining 3 tablespoons oil and heat it over moderately high heat until it is hot but not smoking. Add the eggplant and cook the mixture, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes, or until the eggplant is softened. Stir in the zucchini and the bell pepper and cook the mixture over the moderate heat, stirring occasionally, for 12 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes and cook the mixture, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 7 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender. Stir in the oregano, the thyme, the coriander, the fennel seeds, the salt, and pepper to taste and cook the mixture, stirring, for 1 minute. Stir in the basil and combine the mixture well. The ratatouille may be made 1 day in advance, kept covered and chilled, and reheated before serving.

 

 

 


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