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Uneven Water Supply for West

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Tuesday, July 15, 2014

 

WASHINGTON, June 18, 2014 -- The final water supply forecast for this year shows the West divided into a wet north and dry south while snowpack has already melted in much of the region, according to data from the USDA National Water and Climate Center (NWCC).

Washington, most of Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and the northern parts of Colorado and Utah are expected to have near normal or above normal water supplies through the rest of summer, according to the forecasts. Far below normal streamflows are expected for the southern parts of Oregon and Utah, southwestern Idaho, California, Arizona, New Mexico and western Nevada.

Many of these areas are in the nearly 500 counties across the country experiencing drought, 57 of them in California alone, according to USDA disaster designations.

This year saw near-record low snowfall in parts of Nevada, California, Arizona, New Mexico and the southern parts of Utah and Oregon. Even with some May precipitation, those areas remain dry.  The biggest change this season was in the Washington Cascades. At the beginning of February the snowpack was about half of normal, but it recovered and most of Washington will have a near normal water supply from snowmelt, according to the Center. 

Spring snowmelt is well underway, according to NWCC hydrologist Cara McCarthy. “A lot of our SNOTEL sites have already melted out, especially those in the southern half of the West,” McCarthy said.

Colorado had mixed weather during May. “They had winter and summer all in one month: snowmelt, snowfall, snowmelt,” said McCarthy. Heavy precipitation combined with snowmelt, causing flooding in parts of the state.

Forecasters monitor conditions all year, but June is the final forecast of the season. “These are snow-based water supply forecasts,” McCarthy said. “Typically by July there won't be enough snow left on the ground (to measure).”

In Western states where snowmelt accounts for the majority of seasonal water supply, information about snowpack serves as an indicator of future water availability. Streamflow in the West consists largely of accumulated mountain snow that melts and flows into streams as temperatures warm into spring and summer. USDA scientists analyze the snowpack, air temperature, soil moisture and other measurements taken from remote sites to develop the water supply forecasts.

The NWCC water supply forecast is part of several USDA efforts to improve public awareness and mitigate the impacts of climate change, including drought and other extreme weather events. Through the creation of the National Drought Resilience Partnership, launched as part of the President’s Climate Action Plan, federal agencies are working closely with states, tribes and local government to develop a coordinated response to drought.

Since 1939, USDA has conducted snow surveys and issued regular water supply forecasts. View information by state.

Source: USDA


In dry years most Therophytes like
Asteriscus aquaticus are able to flower as very small plants and produce seeds that are able to survive evon more unfavourable seasons.

Green (Roof) Washing

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Baltimore (I-Newswire) June 25, 2014 - Baltimore, MD. Green Roof Service LLC - Green Roof Technology offers the most reliable and cost efficient vegetated roof solutions to meet all challenges of growing vegetation on impervious locations. With efficient and ingenious solutions Green Roof Service LLC - Green Roof Technology successfully designed and engineered multi-million square feet of green roofs across Europe and North America since 1980. Their custom tailored design is even installed on 5 Celebrity Cruise Ships sailing around the world under permanent changing climate conditions.

"I have seen everything", says Jorg Breuning CEO at Green Roof Service LLC, "but what currently happens in the United States can be devastating for an entire industry". Green Roof Service LLC receives weekly calls from clients with green roofs that are not performing as promised.
All of these underperforming green roofs are designed and installed with a lack of experience at any stage of a project or they were compromised in the engineering or construction process.

Especially permanent installed irrigation on extensive green roofs (shallow, light weight functional roof for stormwater retention) is causing increasingly problems with maintenance and operational costs. "Permanent irrigated extensive Green Roofs should not get any incentives from Government, State or Cities", suggests Jorg Breuning. "They don't reduce the stormwater issues of human settlements and they require high amounts of nutrients that can also pollute our water ways."

Irrigated extensive green roofs are often recommend with expensive pre-vegetated green roof systems that are delivered in metal or plastic boxes (often called trays or planters) and then simply placed on a rooftop. "With these solutions and additionally combined with irrigation, sustainability goes literally down the drain," warns Jorg Breuning, "this is green (roof) washing for quick bucks".

Green roof Service LLC - Green Roof Technology introduced low impact modern green roof technology to North America based on experience and common sense. Their clients truly manage environmental issues without using precious resources, at incredible low operational cost and without any risk of failure.

 

MD Bill 207

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Monday, March 31, 2014

MD HOUSE BILL 207

Today I we received an email by the USGBC requesting to oppose the MD House Bill 207. In the last decades the USGBC grew dramatically. Beside their originally great intention, LEED increased the costs of buildings super proportionally to the benefits for the environment.

In our opinion it is now necessary to naturally develop sustainable practices, solutions and technologies that can be much easier adopted and implemented by environmentally conscious people. With very simple tools (“rain tax”, higher taxes on energy, and responsibility for costs to reduce the negative environmental foot print of buildings etc.) the government now has a great opportunity giving back to builders and building owners the freedom of making their own decisions without the overwhelming pressure and costs from LEED.

Bill 207 helps to increase environmental consciousness of all American individuals and gives them back their freedom and responsibility in making their own decisions.

What is described as a setback by the USGBC is just a desperate reflex and fear of losing revenue and influence. USGBC must learn this lesson and USGBC has to prove that they are still competitive once Bill 207 passed.  

If the USGBC can’t take this as challenge they are worthless to start with.  

We support MD House Bill 207

Green Roofs, Green Infrastructure in Lancaster, PA

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Wednesday, March 05, 2014

Going Green Will Save Lancaster in Controlling Storm Water

Release Date: 03/04/2014
Contact Information: David Sternberg, 215-814-5548 sternberg.david@epa.gov

-New EPA Report Documents Savings-

(LANCASTER, Pa. – March 4, 2014) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a report today that found green infrastructure can be a cost effective solution to controlling stormwater while providing numerous economic benefits. Using the City of Lancaster as a case study, EPA sought to quantify the economic benefits associated with utilizing green infrastructure for controlling wet weather pollution.


Mayor Rich Gray

“Cities like Lancaster are leading the way in creating cost-effective and innovative solutions to the stormwater challenges we face today,” said EPA Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin. “By keeping rain water from coming into contact with pollution in the first place, green infrastructure improves water quality while making communities more livable.”

The report estimated that within the combined sewer system (CSS) area, Lancaster’s green infrastructure plan will reduce gray infrastructure capital costs by $121.7 million and reduce wastewater pumping and treatment costs by $661,000 per year. It will also provide approximately $2.8 million in energy, air quality, and climate-related benefits annually.

These benefits exceed the costs of implementing green infrastructure, which were estimated to range from $51.6 million if green infrastructure projects were integrated into already planned improvements to $94.5 million if green infrastructure projects were implemented independently.

"The City has invested more than $25 million over the past decade in ‘gray infrastructure’ improvements to increase the capacity of the City’s wastewater system,” said Lancaster Mayor Richard Gray. “In spite of this investment, a significant amount of untreated combined sewage continues to overflow into the Conestoga River and eventually into the Chesapeake Bay. Green infrastructure will help reduce the volume of storm water entering our wastewater system and, at the same time, transform the City into a more sustainable, healthy community.”

Unlike single-purpose gray stormwater infrastructure, which uses pipes to dispose of rainwater, green infrastructure uses vegetation and soil to manage rainwater where it falls. By weaving natural processes into the built environment, green infrastructure provides not only stormwater management, but also flood mitigation, air quality management, and community revitalization.

In 2011, the City of Lancaster released its comprehensive green infrastructure plan. Developed with the assistance of city, county, and state agencies, the plan identified opportunities for adding green infrastructure throughout the city within 5-year and 25-year timeframes; estimated the water quality benefits and articulated a series of policy, outreach, and technical recommendations for implementing green infrastructure in the city.

Because of the plan and the city’s interest in understanding the added benefits of green infrastructure, EPA selected the City of Lancaster to serve as a case study for calculating the additional environmental, social, and economic benefits.

“Valuing multiple benefits of green infrastructure ensures water management investments by the City will help beautify, provide a safer, healthier and more prosperous community,” said Liz Deardorff, Clean Water Supply director at American Rivers.
“The results of this study affirm that green infrastructure has multiple benefits for both large and small cities needing to reduce pollution and ensure clean water.”

 

Lancaster, like hundreds of other cities across the country, has both a combined sewer system (CSS) and a municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4). While the CSS collects both sewage and stormwater and conveys flows to a wastewater treatment plant, the MS4 collects only stormwater runoff and discharges flow directly to receiving streams.

The report summarized how installing green infrastructure in the CSS area could reduce gray infrastructure capital investments and associated wastewater pumping and treatment costs; as well as how installing green infrastructure in both the CSS and MS4 areas could produce a range of environmental benefits across the city.



A copy of the report can be accessed at this link:
http://owpubauthor.epa.gov/infrastructure/greeninfrastructure/gi_csnortheast.cfm

White Roofs are Better than Green Roofs!

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Friday, January 24, 2014

By Jörg Breuning

According a study from prestigious researches at LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States and School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, reflective roofs have a higher value for building owners than Green Roofs.

Julian Sproula, Man Pun Wanb, Benjamin H. Mandela and Arthur H. Rosenfeld developed a study that clearly explains the monetary benefits of reflective roofs v.s. Green Roofs v.s. traditional roofs. In their reductionist research, the outcome for green roofs is not good.  In a press release they stated:” The researchers acknowledge that their data are somewhat sparse but contend that their analysis is valuable in that it is the first to compare the economic costs and energy savings benefits of all three roof types.” It isn’t the first time – I have seen many worthless studies before…  

I am anchored in the Green Roof Industry since 1980, I roll my eyes and shake my head about counterproductive statements and studies like that. In the yellow pages they would have found somebody who could have told them differently and how to spend the generous money from the industry (other than green roof industry) much better – actually in building a Green Roof. Even when building a Green Roof doesn’t help the building owner (according their study) it would have helped the environment.

Bringing back nature into a location where nature was before is simply the best you can do!

My advice: Don’t start covering your Green Roofs or entire nature with a white piece of plastic – just don’t believe every written word on the internet or commercial reductionist research – Use your gut feeling and think out of the box!

This blog post represents the opinion of Jörg Breuning. If you have another opinion please feel free to contact me.  

Here is a link to the Study.


Akron University Green Roof Sees Season's First Snow

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Tuesday, November 19, 2013


Located on top of the Sydney L. Olson Research Center, Akron University's first green roof is an 18,000 sf extensive green roof with over 15 varieties of perennial plants.  After its first full growing season, the plants are well established and ready for a winter nap.  Initially planted in October 2012, we established this roof without ever irrigating and only lightly fertilizing at a rate of 5 g / m2 (0.0164 oz / ft2) pure Nitrogen.  As you can see from the pictures below, the green roof is growing in very nicely and is home to a variety of insects.



Back in mid-September:  Nearly 1 year of growth. 





Nation’s largest Solar Garden Roof

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Wednesday, July 03, 2013


Photo courtesy of Elkus Manfredi Architects and BHC Architects.

Green Roof Technology is proud to announce their partnership with BHC Architects to design the largest Solar Garden Roof in North America.  The Solar Garden Roof will rest atop the new, soon-to-be build Exelon headquarters in Baltimore, MD. 

Exelon’s office tower will be the tallest building in the upcoming Harbor Point multi-use business park, scheduled for completion in Fall 2014.  

The Exelon headquarters rooftop will house a 40,000 sf green roof and an estimated 400 Sun-Root™ Modules, which will generate approximately 120,000 kWh’s a year.  This will be the largest Solar Garden Roof in North America.

For more information about the Solar Garden Roof System and to see a short video of how it all comes together, please visit:  http://www.greenrooftechnology.com/solar-green-roof.


Combining Urban Rooftop Farming with Public Transportation

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Saturday, June 22, 2013

By: Jörg Breuning

Photo: Bauder, SSB Stuttgart Germany

Germany is the country of inventors, poets and thinkers. According to historical research, rooftop farming has been a long tradition since the mid-evil times in the dense cities of Europe. The lack of open space inside city walls brought people up to their roofs. Because there was also no efficient sewer systems, it was easy to utilize the organic remains to fertilize and grow plants. Throughout the centuries, survival proved to be a tough journey, mainly caused by overpopulation. When it became too dangerous to venture from your house, people discovered their roofs as additional space for growing their own food in order to overcome these rough years. Currently we are witnessing this growing trend once again in many metropolis areas in North America. The motivation is still the same, jobs can be hard to find, it's difficult to stand out when everyone is competing for essentially the same things.

Luckily our sewer systems are more advanced today, synthetic fertilizers are cheap and these farms do not depend on organic remains anymore. The quality of food should be acceptable in this respect - disregarding the extreme rates of pollution within cities.

However, let us backtrack to the topic of inventions.

Growing food on rooftops of the public transportation system (buses and trains) can help to combine two major needs of urban citizens. The added value is that your transportation systems are now also farmer's markets and while riding the bus home from your cubical, you can manage all your food shopping in one step including fresh produce grown directly above - on the roof! If the roof of the transportation vehicle is a semi permeable membrane, the carrots actually can be harvested from the inside. How convenient would this be? Depending on the crop, the sunny routes have more sun loving veggies and the transportation system manages regular crop changes from a more balanced and diverse food supply. Think about all the new jobs being created!

Sure, this technology is just in the beginning stages, but with the current hype for locally grown and diverse environmental approaches, it is just a matter of time until people will also jump on the bandwagon (or bus). It is just as ideal to look for some free advertising space in the press.

So, see you on the Lemon Line or drop me a line from the carrot bus (they should probably invest in free WiFi too).

 

Jörg Breuning welcomes people who want to learn from decades
of green roof experience - askjorg@greenrooftechnology.com

Green Roofs and Stormwater Fee

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Friday, May 17, 2013

Green Roofs Can Reduce Stormwater Runoff, Reduce Stormwater Fees!

By: Rebecca Gullott

Not many Marylanders are happy about paying the new stormwater fee or “rain tax” as it has come to be known. The county imposed fee is based on the amount of impervious surface such as rooftops and driveways on each property (cost-by-cause principle). In Howard County alone there are over 19,000 acres of impervious surfaces that contribute to pollution of local streams and the Chesapeake Bay. 19,000 acres are almost 30 sq miles or 11% of the counties size- more than double the size of all water ways in the county! No wonder that Stormwater runoff is responsible for over 20% of pollution into the bay.

Those wishing to lessen their stormwater fee can reduce the impervious surface area on their property through smart design and management practices. Howard County is providing instruction and incentives for citizens to do just that. Howard County Stormwater Management Division has partnered with several organizations including the University of Maryland Extension to help citizens take control of their environmental impact. Rainscaping workshops will be offered this summer to show residents how to plant and maintain rain gardens and native species; as well as compost waste and use rain barrels to collect roof runoff for use in lawn and garden irrigation or car washing. Howard County is offering free rain barrels at the Alpha Ridge Landfill select Saturdays April through September. Other Maryland Counties have similar programs so check your county’s website to see what offerings are available.

Property owners can receive credits for on-site improvements that reduce impervious surfaces. Whether it’s establishing a rain garden in the yard or incorporating planted areas or green roofs into the company’s parking lot, these incentives may encourage citizens to take control of their environmental impacts. These changes may help to reduce the need for future stormwater fee increases and promote a healthier Chesapeake for years to come.

The possitive impact for the environment by implementing cost-by-cause fess is very effective in many other counties and States in the US and over decades in Europe.

Irrigation on Extensive Green Roofs

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Thursday, May 02, 2013

By: Jörg Breuning

The main purpose of an extensive green roof is stormwater retention and delaying stormwater runoff amongst many other added values.
 
Above: An Irrigated Green Roof 

In the last decade, I've seen many green roofs where the intended plants never really flourished. I estimate that in the US at least 50% of the green roofs are not performing to their fullest potential. This can be observed by simply looking at the most obvious of indicators, the plants themselves, regardless if they were planted on purpose or somehow found the space to take root.  Most of these less healthy extensive green roofs are pre-planted boxes, or commonly known as modular systems. Not only are these systems much more costly, the mid to long term results are often far below systems that are assembled in place and at the time of installation.

I know that the transition from being a common nursery-grown plant (including pre-planted boxes) to the extreme environment of a rooftop poses severe challenges. Green roof plant nurseries typically have "great" advice and recommend the installation of temporary or more permanent irrigation systems. This advice is defeating the purpose of an extensive green roof and shows that asking self-appointed experts can cause a spiral of failures. Since many green roof installers lack the proper horticultural knowledge, they may not be able to identify problems by simply looking at the indicators (the plants). This could cause the problem to gain momentum. In addition, the false conclusion that technology (Google search, Apps, synthetic growth media or sophisticated soil moisture control devices) can fix the problem supports my theory of less experienced or misinformed green roof professionals. They rely heavily on technology to fix any issue and miss the big picture. Nature has the ability to take care of itself, as long as the appropriate design, materials and plants are used in addition to being familiar with the immediate climate.

Green roof designers and green roof professionals must understand that less is often more when it comes to extensive green roofs. No building owner wants to irrigate their roof in short, mid or long terms. There is no need to make a green roof more complicated by using multiple synthetic or plastic layers. LEED™ certification supports using gray (recycled) water for green roof irrigation; but what is the point of watering an extensive system when it's main purpose is to retain stormwater? Common sense and experience are the only two things that will aid in planning the perfect green roof.


Above: An Unirrigated Green Roof

Implementing irrigation on an extensive green roof is a clear sign of not understanding the basic principles of horticultural techniques or the laws of nature. Irrigation reduces the water retention, increases the nutrient pollution in runoff and requires higher fertilization application. Irrigated extensive green roofs are not environmentally friendly, not economically feasible and have hardly any payback for the building owner.

I tell my clients if they have an offer or design for an extensive green roof that includes irrigation - be cautious!

 


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