Back to Home Page
Home   |   Contact Us Ph: 443-345-1578

Green Roof Technology Blog

Visiting 1st Solar Garden Roof

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Wednesday, August 14, 2013

A vast experimental roof top garden is located on the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation Building on Randall’s Island.  A few years ago the department opened its roof top up to companies to display their latest innovations in green roofing.  Over the years several dozen technologies have been installed, making the roof top home to hundreds of kinds of plants.  From lightweight extensive green roofs, to vegetable farms, to solar garden roofs, all kinds of green roofs are open for public tours.

During the early spring of 2012 we had the pleasure of installing four of our Sun-Root™ Modules on the roof, making the department’s building home to the first Solar Garden Roof System in the United States.  Super Storm Sandy made landfall only 6 months after installation and the system was successfully wind tested with maximum sustained winds at 85 mph with some gusts reaching 92 mph. 

Jörg recently visited the roof top and came back with some beautiful pictures we wish to share with you all. The system is engineered to support healthy plant growth under the PV panels - unique and brilliant! Ask us for details and investment options.

 Solar Garden Roof

The Oldest Existing Green Roof in the World

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Friday, August 09, 2013

By: Samantha Yurek

Photo Credit: Flickr - Michel Rodriguez

Located in the city of Lucca, tucked into the rolling hills of Tuscany, Italy, you will find a most magnificent scene. The medieval architecture of the city is gorgeous, but one tower stands taller than the rest.  Attracting more attention as a consequence of the oak trees flourishing on the roof. Seven oaks were originally planted on the roof of the Torre Guinigi back in the 14th or 15th century. Although replacements have been planted over the decades, the seven residing today are still said to be hundreds of years old. Their roots grew together, penetrating the ceiling and creating a more sturdy structure. Oak trees were specifically chosen by the Guinigi family to represent renewal and rebirth. If visiting Italy, this is a great place to visit, for a few Euros you may climb to the top and see this view for yourself! 

Photo Credit: Flickr - Sidstamm

Akron University Green Roof Update

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Thursday, August 08, 2013

Right before Superstorm Sandy came roaring into our lives last October, Akron University had just installed their first green roof. Located on top of the Sydney L. Olson Research Center, this 18,000 square foot extensive green roof has approximately 15 varieties of perennial plants. Grown by seed and sedum cuttings, these perennials made it through the storm and flourished on top this Ohio roof. Without any irrigation systems and very little fertilizers, the green roof is starting to finally show its true colors during these summer months! 

Goodman's Norwegian Log House with Sloped Green Roof

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Wednesday, July 31, 2013

The Goodman’s authentic Norwegian log house and accompanying log cabin are located in Great Falls, Virginia.  Set deep in the woods of Fairfax County near the Potomac River, the Goodman’s enchanting home transports you back to a simpler time in the old country.  Both buildings were imported from Norway in 1971 and were reconstructed with authentic sod roofs.

By 2005 the guest cabin still retained its sod roof but the log house roof had been converted to terracotta tiles by a previous owner.   When the guest cabin’s roof started leaking in 2004, Mr. Goodman decided it was time to upgrade both roofs with modern green roof technology.  A sloped, single course, extensive green roof was installed on the log house and cabin in August 2005.  The goal of the new green roofs was to establish stable, natural looking vegetation with a high biodiversity that through successive change would mimic the surrounding forest.   

An upside-down green wall.  Parthenocissus quinquefolia, commonly known as Virginia creeper, has established well on the roof and now cascades from the roof, creating a beautiful ethereal green wall.

Urban Heat Island and Green Roofs

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Thursday, July 25, 2013

By: Samantha Yurek

With the heat index well into the triple digits lately, it is only appropriate to talk about the urban heat island. A metropolitan area which is significantly warmer than its rural counterparts, the urban heat island effect creates a more brutal environment, especially during these sweltering summer days.

Cities are dense and compact places. Most surface materials in urban spaces are good at absorbing heat, and have no means to transpire. Sunlight heats up these surfaces during the daytime, to temperatures higher than the air. In addition, impervious surfaces are prominent in city landscapes.

Many issues stem from the urban heat island effect, including increased energy consumption, resulting in elevated pollution emissions, compromising human health and comfort. Also, hotter surfaces create warmer runoff, endangering the local bodies of water; rapid temperature changes can be fatal for aquatic life.

Photo Credit: Dustin Phillips

Now we understand the urban heat island phenomenon, but is it easily resolved? 

Unfortunately with the amount of people residing in urban areas, the energy released will always be greater compared to rural areas. Although, there are ways to mitigate the hotter temperatures. In rural areas, temperatures are moderated through evapotranspiration, with vegetation being the main aid in cooler and healthier environments. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, "Trees, vegetation and green roofs can reduce heating and cooling energy use and associated air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, remove air pollutants, sequester and store carbon, help lower the risk of heat-related illnesses and deaths, improve stormwater control and water quality, reduce noise levels, create habitats, improve aesthetic qualities, and increase property values."

By increasing vegetation in urban areas and the surrounding commercial belts in the form of street trees and green roofs, we can help create a cooler and healthier environment for ourselves. Not to mention a much more attractive landscape.

Nation’s largest Solar Garden Roof

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Photo courtesy of Elkus Manfredi Architects and BHC Architects.

Green Roof Technology is proud to announce their partnership with BHC Architects to design the largest Solar Garden Roof in North America.  The Solar Garden Roof will rest atop the new, soon-to-be build Exelon headquarters in Baltimore, MD. 

Exelon’s office tower will be the tallest building in the upcoming Harbor Point multi-use business park, scheduled for completion in Fall 2014.  

The Exelon headquarters rooftop will house a 40,000 sf green roof and an estimated 400 Sun-Root™ Modules, which will generate approximately 120,000 kWh’s a year.  This will be the largest Solar Garden Roof in North America.

For more information about the Solar Garden Roof System and to see a short video of how it all comes together, please visit:

New Sun-Root™ System Installed

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Tuesday, June 25, 2013

By Samantha Yurek

Last Wednesday, June 19th, Green Roof Technology traveled to Northern Virginia to help install a green roof demonstration project, complete with a Sun-Root System™. Being the latest achievement in sustainable design, the Sun-Root System™ effectively combines solar power with vegetated roofs.

Working with the company Prospect Solar, we were able to help preserve the environment and promote renewable energy. Prospect Solar was established in 2010 by the well-known Prospect Waterproofing Company. One of the leading specialty roofing companies in the DC area, they have been successful for over twenty years. Prospect Solar has been following in their footsteps, creating more sustainable alternatives to the traditional roofing practices. 

A Solar Garden Roof for Non-Profits

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Friday, June 21, 2013

By: Ryan Miller

Renewable energy is an attractive tool that businesses can use to offset rising energy costs. What makes renewable energy so attractive are the Federal and State incentives that cover over 30% of the costs to install the system. An investment today in a Solar Garden Roof creates a path of energy independence where your rooftop is producing the power necessary to run your building, instead of the local power plant.

So how does a non-taxable entity like a non-profit organization (NPO) take advantage of the plethora of incentives to produce energy for their own building? Fortunately there is an investment option tailored for NPO's called a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA). PPA's are used in situations where a site host does not desire to outlay the capital required to purchase a system, or is not able to take advantage of the tax benefits available due to being a non-tax paying entity. Through the PPA, the NPO will have no upfront investment nor carry any of the ongoing operations and maintenance obligations. The NPO will then enter into an agreement to purchase the energy produced at a rate below current energy rates.

With this setup, the NPO will make uniform, monthly payments at a reduced cost when compared to the current energy bill. After a set period of time, the NPO can decide to purchase the array from the investors at an agreed upon price. From there the system is paid off and the NPO is enjoying free energy, thanks to the SUN!

Green Roof Service/Green Roof Technology works with NPOs and investors to tailor the right PPA for an investment in a Solar Garden Roof.

Swarthmore College Performing Arts Center Green Roof Install

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Tuesday, June 18, 2013


Our relationship with Swarthmore College began nearly a decade ago. We have had the privilege of working with the college on several other green roofs, a few of which appear on the front cover of popular green roof books.

This past Friday, Andrew went to Swarthmore College to oversee the install of the college's newest green roof. The Furbish Company was awarded the contract to install the 31,000 square foot green roof.

On a beautiful afternoon, the Furbish installers added the final touches on one of the lower roofs. The custom designed green roof is a hybrid single-course system that utilizes heavy-weight drainage and retention fabrics (provided by Resource Conservation Technology), a 100% pumice growing media layer (provided by Stancills Inc.) and sedum mats (by Sedum Master). This system was utilized due to the roof's weight capacity limitation.




Green Roofs are Standard on Passive Houses

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Friday, June 14, 2013

By: Samantha Yurek

Photo Source: Wikipedia

In the past few decades sustainable building practices have come a long way. Many designers are striving to use the latest technologies to create more environmentally friendly conscience structures. Some of the best examples of sustainable buildings are considered Passive Houses. Germany is at the forefront of this trend, having been researching and developing specific environmental design principles since the early 1990s. These principles surpass LEED™ certifications and are overall less expensive. Energy consumption of a Passive House is between five to ten times lower than an average (LEED™) building, decreasing the environmental footprint two to five times. 

These houses are designed with many modifications. Exterior walls tend to be two to three times thicker when compared to conventional home. Natural and controlled ventilation systems are also prominent, helping to keep temperature balanced throughout the entire building. All these modifications make Passive Houses almost completely airtight and soundproof. Many of these houses are designed to include a green roof or solar powered system

Photo Source: Wikipedia - as you can see, this passive house on the right

In 2010, there were over 25,000 Passive Houses in Germany and around 13 in the United States. In Urbana, Illinois, the first Passive house was erected in America, back in 2003.

Follow Us!

RSSGreen Roof Tech Blog
RSSGreen Roof Plant Blog

Recent Posts



Latest Blog Posts
  1. Sustainability, Resilience: Green Team at Green Roof Technology, 09-Feb-2018
  2. Health Care and Green Infrastructure Green Team at Green Roof Technology, 06-Feb-2018
Facebook   Twitter   LinkedIn   Google+   YouTube
Go To Resources Page