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Akron University Green Roof Update

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Thursday, August 08, 2013

Right before Superstorm Sandy came roaring into our lives last October, Akron University had just installed their first green roof. Located on top of the Sydney L. Olson Research Center, this 18,000 square foot extensive green roof has approximately 15 varieties of perennial plants. Grown by seed and sedum cuttings, these perennials made it through the storm and flourished on top this Ohio roof. Without any irrigation systems and very little fertilizers, the green roof is starting to finally show its true colors during these summer months! 

Fireworks and Green Roofs

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Thursday, July 04, 2013

Fireworks and Green Roofs

Practically all dry organic materials are combustible at relative low temperatures. Roof shingles or many waterproofing membranes on roofs are typically petroleum-based products (including Asphalt) and they is hardly a difference to dry organic materials. Some products are equipped with chemical fire retardants that could decrease the risk of spreading fire, not the risk of leaks cause by impact.

The living vegetation of functional and well-engineered green roofs contain high moisture contents and most plants (especially succulent plants on large extensive green roofs) have a fraction of the energetic potential comparing to all other components used in a building. The green roof growing media (soil for the green roof plants) is a blend of different mineral components with an organic content of typically less that 15%. It is practically impossible to set this material on fire – not even considering the natural moisture content.

Many fires or leaks on roofs caused by consumer or display fireworks could have been prevented if the building would have had a fully functional green roof or a well-maintained conventional roof (regular removing of organic debris from the roof and gutters).

A fire is the worst-case scenario; however in most cases smoldering firework parts (and cigarettes) are causing leaks on unprotected roofs that are discovered much later. These problems are unknown on functional green roofs. When a green roof prevents a leak or even a fire it is typically not recognized but the payback is right there.

Nature is (literally) so cool.

Combining Urban Rooftop Farming with Public Transportation

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Saturday, June 22, 2013

By: Jörg Breuning

Photo: Bauder, SSB Stuttgart Germany

Germany is the country of inventors, poets and thinkers. According to historical research, rooftop farming has been a long tradition since the mid-evil times in the dense cities of Europe. The lack of open space inside city walls brought people up to their roofs. Because there was also no efficient sewer systems, it was easy to utilize the organic remains to fertilize and grow plants. Throughout the centuries, survival proved to be a tough journey, mainly caused by overpopulation. When it became too dangerous to venture from your house, people discovered their roofs as additional space for growing their own food in order to overcome these rough years. Currently we are witnessing this growing trend once again in many metropolis areas in North America. The motivation is still the same, jobs can be hard to find, it's difficult to stand out when everyone is competing for essentially the same things.

Luckily our sewer systems are more advanced today, synthetic fertilizers are cheap and these farms do not depend on organic remains anymore. The quality of food should be acceptable in this respect - disregarding the extreme rates of pollution within cities.

However, let us backtrack to the topic of inventions.

Growing food on rooftops of the public transportation system (buses and trains) can help to combine two major needs of urban citizens. The added value is that your transportation systems are now also farmer's markets and while riding the bus home from your cubical, you can manage all your food shopping in one step including fresh produce grown directly above - on the roof! If the roof of the transportation vehicle is a semi permeable membrane, the carrots actually can be harvested from the inside. How convenient would this be? Depending on the crop, the sunny routes have more sun loving veggies and the transportation system manages regular crop changes from a more balanced and diverse food supply. Think about all the new jobs being created!

Sure, this technology is just in the beginning stages, but with the current hype for locally grown and diverse environmental approaches, it is just a matter of time until people will also jump on the bandwagon (or bus). It is just as ideal to look for some free advertising space in the press.

So, see you on the Lemon Line or drop me a line from the carrot bus (they should probably invest in free WiFi too).

 

Jörg Breuning welcomes people who want to learn from decades
of green roof experience - askjorg@greenrooftechnology.com

Green Roofs and Native Organisms

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Friday, May 10, 2013

Green Roofs and Native Organisms

 

It is all about perspectives, experience and evolution. Any organism has a right to exist.  It is the intention of each organism to multiply, spread and adjust to the surrounding environmental conditions.  This adamant approach has also helped humans to develop and thrive over ten thousands of years.  The word native has become a stereotype of certain organisms like plants that should be growing only in a particular region – that is what humans think.

Exceptions seem only allowed with human approval and when they support human development – this is one reason why nobody has a problem with Gen manipulated corn for “bio fuel”. When our ideal of a functional environment gets out of balance there is always a solution from clever people with a weapon (solution) allegedly reversing the discovered issues. Sometimes an issue has to be created first to offer a solution to gain some popularity and attention. A few of them are even henchmen for big companies that intend to increase sales for an existing product in a new market. The system works in all levels but it is questionable when I see these paramilitary battles on TV commercials against a dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) what is a “native” plant and it is clearly classified as a beneficial weed.

Europe has Banned Potent Pesticides

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Wednesday, May 01, 2013

By: Samantha Yurek

Honey bees are the most significant pollinators on earth. They are responsible for pollinating approximately 80% of our flowering crops.  "If the bee disappeared off the surface of the globe, then man would only have four years of life left."  It may be questionable to whether this quote came directly from Albert Einstein himself, but it is indisputable that the honeybee population is essential for maintaining the quality of life we enjoy so much.

Yesterday, the European Union stood up for the honeybees and banned a group of potent pesticides classified as neonicotinoids. Neonicotinoids are commonly used to prevent pests on plants such as soy, corn, canola, sugar and wheat. Evidence has surfaced that these pesticides are responsible for the honeybee decline or Colony Collapse Disorder, a phenomenon that appeared in 2006. Neonicotinoids are known to agitate the honeybee's reproduction processes, communication and navigation skills, along with weakening their immune systems. 

 

We take pride in avoiding herbicides and pesticides at Green Roof Technology. A green roof is an excellent habitat for all pollinators, especially honeybees. Watch a video about beehives on rooftops in Baltimore or learn about the plants you may choose specifically to lure these fuzzy creatures to your green roof!


Photo Credit: Green Roof Technology

First Steps to Planning a Green Roof

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Tuesday, April 23, 2013

 By: Samantha Yurek

Happy Earth Week! Hopefully everyone has taken some time out of their busy lives to lend a hand to our beautiful planet we inhabit. Whether it is picking up some litter, planting a tree or deciding to go all out and look into acquiring a green roof! Here are a few things you should have a good idea of before you leap into the planning process.

1. How sturdy is your roof?  Adding growing media and plants to your rooftop adds weight to your structure. Make sure your roof can handle some extra weight first. Find out the materials and structure of your building.

2. Is your roof sloped?  A slight slope is perfectly fine, but anything steeper than 15 degrees, the roof might become a slide for the plants without additional constructive design.

3. How much are you willing to spend?  Implementing a green roof is an investment for the future. Simple extensive vegetated roofs usually cost around $10-$15 a square foot (pre-grown planter boxes or modular systems are more expensive). Many local programs will help pay for green infrastructure, based on the environmental benefits. 

4. What type of green roof are you looking for?  A simple meadow-like area, not accessible and mainly for the environmental benefits (extensive) or an intensive roof, complete with recreational room and the potential for larger plants such as trees.

5. How are the sunlight conditions?  The majority of green roof plants enjoy direct sunlight to flourish. If the building is situated in a heavily shade area, the green roof plant selection becomes limited.

6. Do you want an integrated solar green roof?  The Sun-Root™ System is the newest of technologies, a fully integrated system and an ideal symbiosis of PV panels and an extensive green roof. It is easy to install and will not penetrate the roof. The entire system has the potential to pay back within 5 years and also meets stormwater requirements in all cities of North America.

 

Do your homework first before deciding on a green roof, our website is a great starting point to increase your green roof knowledge. If you're interested in a green roof or have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us, we would be happy to help you get started today!

Extensive verses Intensive - Which Would You Choose?

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Tuesday, April 16, 2013

By: Samantha Yurek 

A lot of thought goes into the design process when starting a green roof project. One of the biggest questions involves the type of green roof you want; extensive or intensive? This decision will dictate everything that will need to happen for your green roof to become a success. Let us take a quick look at the differences between intensive and extensive green roofs.


Extensive Green Roof: Swarthmore College of PA, Photo Credit: Green Roof Technology

Extensive green roofs are considered the simpler version because the roof structure is usually equipped to withstand the little bit of extra weight. With only a maximum of 6" of growing media and mostly ground cover covering plants, and extensive roof is certainly of a lower profile. The plants consist mainly of sedums and other succulents, herbs, grasses, mosses and low-growing perennials. An extensive roof is mainly for environmental benefits and and occasionally accessible to the public. Extensive green roofs can be excellent combined with Solar panels what increases the environmental benefits and increases return of investment substantially.


Intensive Green Roof: The Ledge Restaurant in Boston, Photo Credit: High View Creations

Intensive green roofs on the other hand can become quite extravagant. The roof must be very sturdy in order to hold foot traffic, deeper growing media and larger plants. The plants found on an intensive green roof range from shrubs and perennials to larger trees. Accents such as ponds and recreational spaces are a possibility. An intensive green roof is a busy and more expensive system with more potential for greater designs and biodiversity.

Education & Green Roofs - A Learning Experience

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Wednesday, April 03, 2013

By: Samantha Yurek     

                 
                                                     Photocredit: The Calhoun School

The Calhoun School in NYC is a great example of a school utilizing green roof space to form environmental curriculum and promote a hands on learning experience. Back in May of 2005, renovations presented the perfect chance to retro-fit the building with a brand new intensive green roof. The green roof wasn't simply installed for environmental benefits; these renovations created a unique opportunity for outdoor science classrooms and an herb garden in the heart of an urban space. 

Implementing intensive green roofs, extensive green roofs or educational rooftop farms within urban schools would be a great learning tool as well as a benefit to the environment. Besides the obvious positive environmental aspects (stormwater mitigation, insulation, urban heat island relief, etc.) this green space can be used as an outdoor classroom, gardening space or for research.

Incorporating environmental education into an elementary cirriculum is beneficial for two main reasons. Learning to respect the environment at an early age is relatable to environmental ethics later in life. An environmentally friendly routine during childhood makes it more likely that these habits will continue down the road. And spending secondly, spending time outside improves self-esteem, motivation, reading ability and imagination, along with calming capabilities and decreases stress levels.

In the current age of technology, it is easy to spend the majority of your day staring into a glowing screen considering our dependence on computers, smart phones, TVs and e-readers amongst others. Children especially spend a significant amount of time with electronics as companions, inside and outside of school. I may still be in my early twenties, but within the past decade trends have quickly changed; my childhood was spent outside, no internet, no cable, and no smart phones, unlike today. The consequence of a lack of time spent outside has been researched in depth by journalist and author, Richard Louv. He has deemed this phenomenon as Nature Deficit Disorder, and explains the issues associated with a lack of nature in childhood in his book "Last Child in the Woods," published in 2005.

Intensive green roofs can bring a whole new set of opportunities right into the classroom. Hands on experiences, the potential for learning about and growing fresh food, and an on-site outdoor classroom are a few worth mentioning.

First International Bird Airport on Intensive Green Roof

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Monday, February 18, 2013

 Ornithoport in Bonn

Picture: Bundeskunsthalle

Airports are plentiful in our world, but a unique concept involves creating airports specifically for birds.  An exhibition on the roof of the Art and Exhibition Hall over the summer of 2012, highlights this common area as a destination point for birds.  To aid this bird airport (ornithoport), nesting boxes and feeders were installed, as well as approach and departure structures, complete with flashing airport signals and safety announcements.  All together this presentation is not only an awesome art piece, but probably the best landing facility for birds from all around the world.  The curator of this project, Professor Res Ingold explains, "In our case, it is an artistic project with scientific backing."

Founded in 1992, the Art and Exhibition Hall of the Federal Republic of Germany has played an important role in the community of Bonn, Germany.  Designed by the architect, Gustar Peichl, the building displays various exhibitions in fields of art, archeology, cultural history, science, and technology.  Aside from exhibitions, the community center frequently hosts symposiums, conferences, performances and concerts.  One of the more attractive aspects of the building is the intensive rooftop garden, which is often site for sculpture displays.  This vegetated rooftop is a nice addition for relaxing with a fantastic view of the surrounding city.  In the summer refreshments are served at the beer garden, wildflowers brighten the landscape and the air is busy with buzzing honeybees.  Multiple honey bee colonies call this rooftop garden home.  In 2012 these little magnificent creatures produced 1,200 pounds of honey!  Accurate daily monitoring of the productivity of the honey bees is accessible online in German, French and English. 

A Nice Gift for Green Roofers - Un Jardin sur le Toit – First Green Roof Fragrance

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Monday, January 14, 2013

Un Jardin sur le Toit – First Green Roof Fragrance

by Jorg Breuning

Jardin sur le Toit by Hermès features a little slice of nature perched on the rooftop of the building of the house of Hermès in Paris, France. A feast for the sense and the mind. A fragrance of light and delight, crunchy and cheerful.

 

Hermes launches the new fourth fragrance from the collection of garden-inspired fragrances Un Jardin, named Un Jardin Sur Le Toit or “A Garden on the Roof” in 2011. Un Jardin Sur Le Toit refers to the especially luxurious garden located on the Hermes’ headquarters building roof. A secret roof garden, hidden in the heart of the city, in Paris.

The garden is full of aromatic herbs, flowers and fruits whose flavors vary as they pass through the metamorphosis induced by the seasons. Its fresh and sweet-smelling atmosphere is captured by apple, pear, rose, green grass, basil, magnolia and compost notes.  This fruity, vegetal, floral eau de toilette is appreciated by both women and men.

The composition is designed by Jean-Claude Ellena.

Picture: http://www.lacentraldelperfume.com


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