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Green Roof Technology Blog

Revisiting an Award Winning Green Roof

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Friday, August 30, 2013


Green Roof Technology has had the pleasure of working with Royal Caribbean to design and implement natural grass lawns on five of their flagship Celebrity Cruises vessels.  Each Solstice Class ship is equipped with over 20,000 sf of lush fairway quality grass.  We are thrilled to be able to say that our green roofs have sailed around the world countless times.  

This past week Jorg was asked to check in on one ship that is currently sailing about the Mediterranean Sea.  A minor disruption had occurred in the  irrigation system and needed to be attended to.  Armed with myriad senors and software updates, Jorg jetted off to Rome to meet up with the ship in port.  Jorg returns next week and we will update you with a complete report of his excursion. 

Have a great weekend! 

Hudson Street Green Wall

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Monday, August 26, 2013

The Coalition to End Childhood Lead Poisoning has recently renovated its headquarters in the Canton neighborhood, Baltimore, MD.  A much improved exterior is soon be pair with an entirely new interior.  Next month, Green Roof Technology will be installing a series of custom planters that will support a variety of vines that will adorn the walls of the Hudson Street Garage Building.  A steel wire trellis system will provide the support the vines need to grow about the walls.  Three new street trees will also be planted out front of the building, adding to the greening objective of the Coalition.  

We are all looking forward to beginning construction in September and we will be sure to post a few pictures for you all to enjoy.


Protection for Honey Bees

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Friday, August 23, 2013

By: Samantha Yurek


Photo Credit: Demetrius Freeman - NY Times

Recently making an appearance on the front page of TIME Magazine honey bees are really starting to stir up popular interest.  But why all of the sudden? About a decade ago honey bees started dying off an alarming rates.  This past winter, nearly one third of honey bee colonies in the United States died or disappeared.  In June over 25,000 honey bees were found dead in a Target parking lot in Oregon.  Cause of death: an insecticide which contained neonicotinoids - a topic I covered back in May when the European Union took a stand and banned these killer pesticides.


  
 

Recognition of the significance of this issue is finally surfacing.  Although started back in 2009, National Honey Bee Day was a more popular holiday this year. A grassroots effort by beekeepers and interest groups to promote community awareness on honeybees, this holiday was celebrates this past Saturday August 17th.  The theme this year: "Beekeeping - Ask Me How to Get Started."  Farmer's markets and nature centers among others all over participated, educating the public on honey bees. 

All this commotion about these buzzing little creatures is beginning to pay off. The Environmental Protection Agency has ordered a reduction in the use of widely known pesticides and a change in labeling on pesticides to educate the consumer on the harm to certain pollinators.


Photo Credit: Jörg Breuning

Honey bee efforts have been popping up all over the country. These efforts have not only been seen on rural farms, but even on rooftops in the city! One example perched seven floors up, 100,000 honey bees buzz busily, hard at work to keep a Manhattan green roof flourishing. Green roofs are a great place to start an undisturbed honey bee colony. Let's not forget how important these little creatures are in our ecosystem and how essential they are to our food production. Take some time to learn more about the amazing honey bee!

Green Roof Technology doesn't allow the use of herbicides or pesticides on any green roof project since 1980!

Therapeutic Properties of Green Roofs

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Monday, August 19, 2013

By: Samantha Yurek


Situated on the 8th floor, this green roof is within view of
many of the hospital's rooms at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore.

Flowering plants are a common sight spotting in any hospital wing, mainly attached with get well soon tags. The new trend seems to be green that will last more than a week or two. Many hospitals and health wellness buildings are incorporating green space, much of it making an appearance on the rooftops. Staring at an attractive green landscape rather than an unappealing tar-stained rooftop has the potential to make every patient calmer and happier on a daily basis. It has been proven that views of natural landscapes have a positive effect on the emotional and mental health of those being treated, as well as those visiting.

The Baltimore Sun recently published an article in their healing section titled, Garden Rx: Hospitals and homeowners alike are investing in the therapeutic properties of landscaped places. The article highlights the addition of healing gardens in well-known hospitals in Baltimore such as Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore Washington Medical Center, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital and the UMD Rehabilitation and Orthopedic Institute.

Many of these healing gardens are designed to give patients, family and employees green space to relax and learn and heal within. The addition of green roof space provides many hospital rooms with preferred views of green plant life instead of a bland, brick building. Mercy Medical Center incorporated both healing gardens within a green roof, utilizing their space for both environmental and social benefits.

But not all patients can experience the benefits of an outdoor garden consequence of a compromised immune system. Months spent in the hospital battling leukemia created a unique opportunity for one SUNY-ESF landscape architecture student, Kevan Busa. Determined to graduate on time, but confined within the walls of a hospital, Kevan completed his final project on the healing potential of landscape design from a patient's perspective. Highlighted in the June 2013 issue of Landscape Architecture Magazine, Kevan explains the frustration of a poorly designed healing space. A visit to an outdoor garden is out of the question for many patients. Busa wrote, "the solution may be gardens that can be experienced from indoors, through glass. This idea may not sound terribly inviting, but it is a far preferable alternative to 100 days of brick walls."

Green roof space that can be viewed from individual hospital rooms could be the solution to a quicker healing time and happier patients.

A well-known hospital in Germany, Diakonie-Klinikum Stuttgart, has approximately 150,000 square feet of green roof along with indoor plants as large as trees. The greening of this hospital has been an ongoing process since 1990.

Visiting 1st Solar Garden Roof

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Wednesday, August 14, 2013

A vast experimental roof top garden is located on the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation Building on Randall’s Island.  A few years ago the department opened its roof top up to companies to display their latest innovations in green roofing.  Over the years several dozen technologies have been installed, making the roof top home to hundreds of kinds of plants.  From lightweight extensive green roofs, to vegetable farms, to solar garden roofs, all kinds of green roofs are open for public tours.

During the early spring of 2012 we had the pleasure of installing four of our Sun-Root™ Modules on the roof, making the department’s building home to the first Solar Garden Roof System in the United States.  Super Storm Sandy made landfall only 6 months after installation and the system was successfully wind tested with maximum sustained winds at 85 mph with some gusts reaching 92 mph. 

Jörg recently visited the roof top and came back with some beautiful pictures we wish to share with you all. The system is engineered to support healthy plant growth under the PV panels - unique and brilliant! Ask us for details and investment options.

 Solar Garden Roof

The Oldest Existing Green Roof in the World

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Friday, August 09, 2013

By: Samantha Yurek


Photo Credit: Flickr - Michel Rodriguez

Located in the city of Lucca, tucked into the rolling hills of Tuscany, Italy, you will find a most magnificent scene. The medieval architecture of the city is gorgeous, but one tower stands taller than the rest.  Attracting more attention as a consequence of the oak trees flourishing on the roof. Seven oaks were originally planted on the roof of the Torre Guinigi back in the 14th or 15th century. Although replacements have been planted over the decades, the seven residing today are still said to be hundreds of years old. Their roots grew together, penetrating the ceiling and creating a more sturdy structure. Oak trees were specifically chosen by the Guinigi family to represent renewal and rebirth. If visiting Italy, this is a great place to visit, for a few Euros you may climb to the top and see this view for yourself! 


Photo Credit: Flickr - Sidstamm

Akron University Green Roof Update

Green Team at Green Roof Technology, - Thursday, August 08, 2013

Right before Superstorm Sandy came roaring into our lives last October, Akron University had just installed their first green roof. Located on top of the Sydney L. Olson Research Center, this 18,000 square foot extensive green roof has approximately 15 varieties of perennial plants. Grown by seed and sedum cuttings, these perennials made it through the storm and flourished on top this Ohio roof. Without any irrigation systems and very little fertilizers, the green roof is starting to finally show its true colors during these summer months! 


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